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Protecting The Community, Through Fire Prevention

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Home2022-06-28T16:32:16-05:00

Fire Chief Welcome

Welcome to the Sheldon Community Fire & Rescue website. We hope to reach out to the community and provide safety tips, fire prevention techniques, and useful resources.

The department has been in service since 1955, and began with the merger of 2 departments.

The men and women that make up the department are your neighbors, friends, and relatives, and are actively involved in the community. We are striving to make this a better place to work, live and raise your family.

Facilities

Sheldon Community Fire and Rescue has a long-standing commitment and history of providing a rapid response time from one of our 3 stations.

Personnel

We are staffed by personnel that consider the community and residents their home and family.

Latest News

We strive to keep the public up-to-date on what’s going on in our community. See below for the latest news from Sheldon Community Fire & Rescue.

U.S. Fire Administration- November Fire Safety Resources

High Rise Apartment and Condominium Fire Safety In November, USFA is sharing new social media cards and a downloadable and customizable infographic to remind people about fire safety in high rise apartments and condominiums. There are unique safety concerns for people living in these buildings. In the first nine months of 2020, the U.S. media reported 204 fatalities in apartments and condominiums. While deaths in high rises are generally lower than single family homes, because [...]

November 6th, 2020|

Photos from Houston Professional Fire Fighters Association's post ... See MoreSee Less

Image attachment

Comment on Facebook

🙏🏼🙏🏼🙏🏼🙏🏼🙏🏼

🙏

Hope he gets better

On scene with a report of a ruptured utility line, possibly natural gas, so being checked out. ... See MoreSee Less

On scene with a report of a ruptured utility line, possibly natural gas, so being checked out.

Comment on Facebook

where at ?

Remember, use the right lamp or your meter is useless.

Be careful responders

Lots of rain predicted for this new week. With much rain, the ground will be saturated. You probably already know the hot spots. Flash floods occur suddenly and usually within hours of excessive heavy rainfall. Flash floods become raging torrents of water, ripping through neighborhoods, streets, etc. - sweeping away whatever is in their path. Heavy rain should be a signal that alerts you to the possibility of dangerous flood conditions. Be safe! ☔️ ... See MoreSee Less

Lots of rain predicted for this new week. With much rain, the ground will be saturated.  You probably already know the hot spots. Flash floods occur suddenly and usually within hours of excessive heavy rainfall. Flash floods become raging torrents of water, ripping through neighborhoods, streets, etc. - sweeping away whatever is in their path.  Heavy rain should be a signal that alerts you to the possibility of dangerous flood conditions. Be safe! ☔️

EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT!!!

With our employee spotlight at Sheldon Community Fire & Rescue, we are hoping to accomplish two things:

1. Put a face to the firefighters who serve within the community &
2. Show our great appreciation to our members within the department with a little recognition. This week’s spotlight is Jeffery Laughlin
Jeff is a husband, father & grandfather. He has been with his wife Patricia, for 22 years. They have 6 children. The oldest is Camilia and the youngest is Matthew. Matthew is 20 years old, and he will be graduating with his bachelor's in public health at Texas A& M University. He has 5 grandchildren Caleb, Skyla, Niko, Cason, and Noah.
Hobbies include Triathlon training, visiting State Parks in his little camper with his wife, and family get-togethers with his children and grandchildren playing board games. He qualified for the United States Triathlon Nationals this year. He also enjoys mechanical work; his father was a mechanic and Jeff has been working on parts and vehicles since he was 8 years old.
Safety message for the community? “Always have a small dry chemical extinguisher accessible in your kitchen.”
Advice for someone who wants to enter public service? “Don’t stop studying, promote, keep getting an education, and finish College.”
Hometown – Kansas City Missouri. He moved to Texas in 1976.
Life before firefighting? He worked in a machine shop as an apprentice and worked office jobs. He has always been a hands-on person and hated being behind a desk.
What drew you to firefighting? He always wanted to serve his community but could not see himself being a police officer. He had an ideal that firefighters are jacks of all trades which he is, so he pursued being a firefighter.
He started his career with the Houston Fire Department in 2001. Most of his career there he spent on the north side of Houston. He currently drives an ARFF truck at Bush Intercontinental Airport. Jeff has been with Sheldon Community Fire & Rescue for 20 years. Currently he has the most time in service with department as a part time member. Jeff has always been a very self-motivated problem solver and is willing to fix anything that comes his way. He says the department has come a long way since he started. When he started, he remembered that some of the volunteers had to make self-repairs to department vehicles. He can remember an old Crown Victoria taken a part with the rear end being rebuilt on the apparatus floor. The vehicle was used as a duty vehicle for volunteers.
A little message from Jeff. It has always been very evident to him that the leadership within the department has always had a vested interest in the community. The Fire Chief, Chief Sidney Webb would come to the station every morning around 630 and check on the employees and department. Back then the chief was pulling double duty between his job at CenterPoint and being a fire Chief here at Sheldon. He wants everyone to know still to this day we are here to serve the community.
Jeff, we appreciate your service and are grateful for you to be a part of our team.
... See MoreSee Less

EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT!!! 
  
With our employee spotlight at Sheldon Community Fire & Rescue, we are hoping to accomplish two things: 
 
1. Put a face to the firefighters who serve within the community & 
2. Show our great appreciation to our members within the department with a little recognition. This week’s spotlight is Jeffery Laughlin 
Jeff is a husband, father & grandfather.  He has been with his wife Patricia, for 22 years. They have 6 children. The oldest is Camilia and the youngest is Matthew. Matthew is 20 years old, and he will be graduating with his bachelors in public health at Texas A& M University.  He has 5 grandchildren Caleb, Skyla, Niko, Cason, and Noah.  
Hobbies include Triathlon training, visiting State Parks in his little camper with his wife, and family get-togethers with his children and grandchildren playing board games.  He qualified for the United States Triathlon Nationals this year.  He also enjoys mechanical work; his father was a mechanic and Jeff has been working on parts and vehicles since he was 8 years old.  
Safety message for the community? “Always have a small dry chemical extinguisher accessible in your kitchen.” 
Advice for someone who wants to enter public service?  “Don’t stop studying, promote, keep getting an education, and finish College.”  
Hometown – Kansas City Missouri. He moved to Texas in 1976.   
Life before firefighting? He worked in a machine shop as an apprentice and worked office jobs. He has always been a hands-on person and hated being behind a desk.  
What drew you to firefighting? He always wanted to serve his community but could not see himself being a police officer. He had an ideal that firefighters are jacks of all trades which he is, so he pursued being a firefighter.  
He started his career with the Houston Fire Department in 2001. Most of his career there he spent on the north side of Houston. He currently drives an ARFF truck at Bush Intercontinental Airport. Jeff has been with Sheldon Community Fire & Rescue for 20 years. Currently he has the most time in service with department as a part time member. Jeff has always been a very self-motivated problem solver and is willing to fix anything that comes his way. He says the department has come a long way since he started. When he started, he remembered that some of the volunteers had to make self-repairs to department vehicles. He can remember an old Crown Victoria taken a part with the rear end being rebuilt on the apparatus floor. The vehicle was used as a duty vehicle for volunteers.  
A little message from Jeff.   It has always been very evident to him that the leadership within the department has always had a vested interest in the community. The Fire Chief, Chief Sidney Webb would come to the station every morning around 630 and check on the employees and department. Back then the chief was pulling double duty between his job at CenterPoint and being a fire Chief here at Sheldon. He wants everyone to know still to this day we are here to serve the community. 
Jeff, we appreciate your service and are grateful for you to be a part of our team.

Comment on Facebook

I worked my very first CPR with Jeff in 05 or 06. He showed me how different training and real life are lol. Some of those lessons I teach my students at work now. Thank you for your service Jeff.

Thanks for your service Sir! We appreciate you very much!

One of the great ones and great work ethic if you can’t figure it out call Jeff!! These young guys could learn a thing or two hanging out with him for a month or a Yr!

Great guy, learned a bunch from him. 💪

Thanks for your service and for taking care of our Sheldon community. We appreciate you!

THANK YOU JEFF , for your SERVICE TO OUR COMMUNITY .

Thank you for your service

Thank you for your service

Hell yeah Jeff. TYFYS!!

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Quick Tips for Driving Across Water
Time for a summary! These six quick tips can make all the difference in the world when there’s water on the road.

Never enter water you cannot cross on foot or water 6 inches or midway up your tires. Avoid crossing over moving water in all instances.

Enter the water at 1-2 mph.

Cross the water at 3-4 mph.

Drive in the center of the road, the highest point.

Let cars cross the road one-by-one.

Dry brakes with slow, light taps after exiting the water.

Defensive driving classes will teach you more skills that can keep you and your passengers safe during natural disasters and everyday driving. If you live in an area that’s prone to flooding it’s also a good idea to create several evacuation routes that can get you to higher ground.
... See MoreSee Less

Quick Tips for Driving Across Water
Time for a summary! These six quick tips can make all the difference in the world when there’s water on the road.

Never enter water you cannot cross on foot or water 6 inches or midway up your tires. Avoid crossing over moving water in all instances.

Enter the water at 1-2 mph.

Cross the water at 3-4 mph.

Drive in the center of the road, the highest point.

Let cars cross the road one-by-one.

Dry brakes with slow, light taps after exiting the water.

Defensive driving classes will teach you more skills that can keep you and your passengers safe during natural disasters and everyday driving. If you live in an area that’s prone to flooding it’s also a good idea to create several evacuation routes that can get you to higher ground.
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